District 221B Hogwarts
Hello. I'm Beth and I'm 24 and I work in a bookshop somewhere in England. I like a lot of things and most of them are fictional.

***

(I don't know how it started, but I often receive asks from people who are feeling sad or troubled. I am always happy to answer these, whether on anon or as a private answer. If you are sad, don't be sad all alone. Type to me- it's fine, I'm from the internet!)

***

(Also, I sometimes like to get existential and talk about how amazing it is to be alive. This has been your warning.)


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sherlocklivesmeanswatsonlives:

mainstreamduckling:

The most important gifset of my life. 

wow. I’m touched by how much emotion this brought out in him.  It seems like he really cares.

6 minutes ago on April 23rd, 2014 | J | 51,859 notes

imran-suleiman:

Photographer Mattias Klum from National Geographic gets up close and personal with a lioness.

1 hour ago on April 23rd, 2014 | J | 64,609 notes

youngparis:

Cocoon and Evolved Metallic Mechanitis Butterfly Chrysalis from Costa Rica 

1 hour ago on April 23rd, 2014 | J | 107,709 notes
sarahmouse:

songofages:

reinqueergamesinthetardis:

tardis-scooter:

Ten is obviously better at this. He doesn’t even have to watch what he’s doing.

that’s because eleven could probably regenerate by tripping on air, falling against the console, and accidentally choking himself with his bow tie at any given moment all at once the dork

Because you know David probably owns every sonic and plays with them at home."Not at the table, dear"

"Sonic. Timelord. Yes."
"Wife. Human. No."

sarahmouse:

songofages:

reinqueergamesinthetardis:

tardis-scooter:

Ten is obviously better at this. He doesn’t even have to watch what he’s doing.

that’s because eleven could probably regenerate by tripping on air, falling against the console, and accidentally choking himself with his bow tie at any given moment all at once the dork

Because you know David probably owns every sonic and plays with them at home.
"Not at the table, dear"

"Sonic. Timelord. Yes."

"Wife. Human. No."

1 hour ago on April 23rd, 2014 | J | 109,312 notes

Richard on working with Benedict in DOS [x]

1 hour ago on April 23rd, 2014 | J | 7,961 notes
Tagged as: #holy shit 
il-tenore-regina:

thalensis:

[Image description: Helen Keller sits by a radio, with her hand over it, in order to feel the vibrations of the music playing]
Helen Keller wrote the following letter to the New York Symphony Orchestra in 1924, describing listening to the “Ninth Symphony” composed by Beethoven - who was also deaf - over the radio: 

“Dear Friends:
I have the joy of being able to tell you that, though deaf and blind, I spent a glorious hour last night listening over the radio to Beethoven’s “Ninth Symphony.” I do not mean to say that I “heard” the music in the sense that other people heard it; and I do not know whether I can make you understand how it was possible for me to derive pleasure from the symphony. It was a great surprise to myself. I had been reading in my magazine for the blind of the happiness that the radio was bringing to the sightless everywhere. I was delighted to know that the blind had gained a new source of enjoyment; but I did not dream that I could have any part in their joy. Last night, when the family was listening to your wonderful rendering of the immortal symphony someone suggested that I put my hand on the receiver and see if I could get any of the vibrations. He unscrewed the cap, and I lightly touched the sensitive diaphragm. What was my amazement to discover that I could feel, not only the vibration, but also the impassioned rhythm, the throb and the urge of the music! The intertwined and intermingling vibrations from different instruments enchanted me. I could actually distinguish the cornets, the roil of the drums, deep-toned violas and violins singing in exquisite unison. How the lovely speech of the violins flowed and plowed over the deepest tones of the other instruments! When the human voices leaped up thrilling from the surge of harmony, I recognized them instantly as voices more ecstatic, upcurving swift and flame-like, until my heart almost stood still. The women’s voices seemed an embodiment of all the angelic voices rushing in a harmonious flood of beautiful and inspiring sound. The great chorus throbbed against my fingers with poignant pause and flow. Then all the instruments and voices together burst forth – an ocean of heavenly vibration – and died away like winds when the atom is spent, ending in a delicate shower of sweet notes.
Of course this was not “hearing,” but I do know that the tones and harmonies conveyed to me moods of great beauty and majesty. I also sense, or thought I did, the tender sounds of nature that sing into my hand-swaying reeds and winds and the murmur of streams. I have never been so enraptured before by a multitude of tone-vibrations.
As I listened, with darkness and melody, shadow and sound filling all the room, I could not help remembering that the great composer who poured forth such a flood of sweetness into the world was deaf like myself. I marveled at the power of his quenchless spirit by which out of his pain he wrought such joy for others – and there I sat, feeling with my hand the magnificent symphony which broke like a sea upon the silent shores of his soul and mine.” 


This woman just described the art of music more perfectly than most hearing musicians.

il-tenore-regina:

thalensis:

[Image description: Helen Keller sits by a radio, with her hand over it, in order to feel the vibrations of the music playing]

Helen Keller wrote the following letter to the New York Symphony Orchestra in 1924, describing listening to the “Ninth Symphony” composed by Beethoven - who was also deaf - over the radio: 

“Dear Friends:

I have the joy of being able to tell you that, though deaf and blind, I spent a glorious hour last night listening over the radio to Beethoven’s “Ninth Symphony.” I do not mean to say that I “heard” the music in the sense that other people heard it; and I do not know whether I can make you understand how it was possible for me to derive pleasure from the symphony. It was a great surprise to myself. I had been reading in my magazine for the blind of the happiness that the radio was bringing to the sightless everywhere. I was delighted to know that the blind had gained a new source of enjoyment; but I did not dream that I could have any part in their joy. Last night, when the family was listening to your wonderful rendering of the immortal symphony someone suggested that I put my hand on the receiver and see if I could get any of the vibrations. He unscrewed the cap, and I lightly touched the sensitive diaphragm. What was my amazement to discover that I could feel, not only the vibration, but also the impassioned rhythm, the throb and the urge of the music! The intertwined and intermingling vibrations from different instruments enchanted me. I could actually distinguish the cornets, the roil of the drums, deep-toned violas and violins singing in exquisite unison. How the lovely speech of the violins flowed and plowed over the deepest tones of the other instruments! When the human voices leaped up thrilling from the surge of harmony, I recognized them instantly as voices more ecstatic, upcurving swift and flame-like, until my heart almost stood still. The women’s voices seemed an embodiment of all the angelic voices rushing in a harmonious flood of beautiful and inspiring sound. The great chorus throbbed against my fingers with poignant pause and flow. Then all the instruments and voices together burst forth – an ocean of heavenly vibration – and died away like winds when the atom is spent, ending in a delicate shower of sweet notes.

Of course this was not “hearing,” but I do know that the tones and harmonies conveyed to me moods of great beauty and majesty. I also sense, or thought I did, the tender sounds of nature that sing into my hand-swaying reeds and winds and the murmur of streams. I have never been so enraptured before by a multitude of tone-vibrations.

As I listened, with darkness and melody, shadow and sound filling all the room, I could not help remembering that the great composer who poured forth such a flood of sweetness into the world was deaf like myself. I marveled at the power of his quenchless spirit by which out of his pain he wrought such joy for others – and there I sat, feeling with my hand the magnificent symphony which broke like a sea upon the silent shores of his soul and mine.” 

This woman just described the art of music more perfectly than most hearing musicians.
1 hour ago on April 23rd, 2014 | J | 1,932 notes

lustyloveylady:

gingerhaze:

HUNGER GAMES COMICS

PART 2

What the books are actually like

1 hour ago on April 23rd, 2014 | J | 205,252 notes
2 hours ago on April 23rd, 2014 | J | 319,021 notes

sherlock-addicted:

iamshurlocked:

ninaloverdj:

Hand HAND …oh please 

LAWD have mercy!

holy shit

18 hours ago on April 22nd, 2014 | J | 1,045 notes

everyoneinthetardis:

onna4:

David Tennant with his wife

image

David Tennant without his wife

image

image

She’s back!

image

I’ve been laughing at this for three years

18 hours ago on April 22nd, 2014 | J | 154,387 notes

vaginal-diabetus:

bbcatemysoul:

don’t you hate it when you take your girlfriend to a nice restaurant to propose to her but then you accidentally end up on top of your ex in the middle of the floor

awkward

image

I know, John…  I know…

20 hours ago on April 22nd, 2014 | J | 5,254 notes
meanmisscharles:

teaforlupin:

intellectualfangirl:

soyeahso:

lono285:

Detective Inspector Sally Donovan’s opinion of Doctor Molly Hooper was cemented the first time they met. For all of her insightful post-mortems, a person who sings “Don’t Say Goodbye” to corpses as she cuts open their chest cavities can’t be right in the head. Even if it is one of Take That’s better songs.
In turn, though Molly admires Sally’s keen wits and instincts, she has little patience for the Detective Inspector’s abrupt personality. Molly can’t help but feel a natural suspicion of anyone who doesn’t even crack a smile at her joke about golf and murder.
But when a serial killer known as The Surgeon starts systematically killing young men, Sally and Molly form a surprisingly productive partnership. As they work feverishly to solve the string of murders, they find that their differing personalities contrast with brilliant results.
Add a shared love for early 90s Britpop to the mix, and Sally and Molly might just discover that, amidst enmity and entrails, their differing personalities also make for a rather brilliant friendship.

This is basically everything.

this is everything

Jesus fuck GIVE ME THE THING NOW

Reblog for Sally

meanmisscharles:

teaforlupin:

intellectualfangirl:

soyeahso:

lono285:

Detective Inspector Sally Donovan’s opinion of Doctor Molly Hooper was cemented the first time they met. For all of her insightful post-mortems, a person who sings “Don’t Say Goodbye” to corpses as she cuts open their chest cavities can’t be right in the head. Even if it is one of Take That’s better songs.

In turn, though Molly admires Sally’s keen wits and instincts, she has little patience for the Detective Inspector’s abrupt personality. Molly can’t help but feel a natural suspicion of anyone who doesn’t even crack a smile at her joke about golf and murder.

But when a serial killer known as The Surgeon starts systematically killing young men, Sally and Molly form a surprisingly productive partnership. As they work feverishly to solve the string of murders, they find that their differing personalities contrast with brilliant results.

Add a shared love for early 90s Britpop to the mix, and Sally and Molly might just discover that, amidst enmity and entrails, their differing personalities also make for a rather brilliant friendship.

This is basically everything.

this is everything

Jesus fuck GIVE ME THE THING NOW

Reblog for Sally

20 hours ago on April 22nd, 2014 | J | 1,200 notes
20 hours ago on April 22nd, 2014 | J | 3,247 notes
plays

primeflix:

Coming Attractions: Her Master’s Voice (2012)

Next week we will be discussing the film Her Master’s Voice (2012) with special guest Jim Markus. It is currently available on Netflix streaming.

21 hours ago on April 22nd, 2014 | J | 1 note

sandandglass:

Nina Conti with her monkey.

21 hours ago on April 22nd, 2014 | J | 528 notes